Thursday, May 19, 2005

Who's In Charge - TV Part II

We've decided to hold off until next week to talk about radio and newspaper, because we got a fantastic question from an anonymous poster:
Anonymous said...
I'm curious, many here say that these newscasts are nothing but crap, and that there is no real reporting going on. How do you define good reporting and a good newscast? What kind of content do you want?


We're starting to get the responses we hoped to get, plus maybe (it is in my shop) it's starting to get people talking about content. So let's keep this thread going. What kind of newscast would you want?

Plus, it was very cool to hear from the news boss at Channel 12 who, although a bit defensive, said his am formula wouldn't work at night. Instinctively we know that, but why not Patrick? Unless it would give away house secrets, what would your ideal newscast say about your community, how its growing, etc.?

Since today we're focused on an officer involved shooting, we're not following what was a great news day in Portland - Tim Boyle's challenge to Portland's City Council, the cell phone tax and who might start a petition drive to kill the new "voter owned election."

On a side note - thanks to everyone contributing in a thoughtful way. Maybe we're getting some people's attention. That's what we wanted.

43 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Since today we're focused on an officer involved shooting, we're not following what was a great news day in Portland - Tim Boyle's challenge to Portland's City Council, the cell phone tax and who might start a petition drive to kill the new "voter owned election."

I think that paragraph answers your own question about what kind of news I'd like to see. I'd like to see news that (as corny as this will sound) affects me. And I don't mean "affects my daily commute," or "affects whether I leave the house with my umbrella," but that affects my life in a substantive and long-lasting way.

Tim Boyle's challenge/rebuke to the council is a good place to start, but I imagine it will get a 20 second mention at about 5.12 tonite, featuring a sound bite of Boyle, a sound bite of Potter/Sten saying they respectfully disagree, and nothing else.

I mean, seriously, PPS is going to lay off 250 teachers/staffers next year. That is an absurdity, yet I have seen, quite literally, traffic accidents given more airtime than this major story about local education.

It's a travesty, and it's like this in every city in the country. And too many stations say "oh, viewers won't watch that kind of stuff," and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Of course they won't--you never air it.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:24:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Unless you are actually the Queen of England, could you kill the royal "we"?

Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:32:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I didn't relize that Tim Boyle's personal business plan takes priority over public opinion. Shouldn't the media delve a little deeper into what he is actually asking for? He is dangerously close to the idiology of fascism. Both the public ownership of PGE and the pulling out of the JTTF are supported by the public and yet Tim Boyles rants against govenement for supporting these two issues. Is he claiming that Government should disregard public opinion in favor of his business philosopy? If so he needs to go back and read a bit about the what happens when a government is in place to serve big business over the people. Its easy to bash the government, but the media should dig a little deeper and ask the question of whether we really want to go down the road of allow unelected business men to dictate government policy.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:33:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Both the public ownership of PGE and the pulling out of the JTTF are supported by the public and yet Tim Boyles rants against govenement for supporting these two issues.

I think that's a slight misreading of his comments. I think his criticism was that the city has misplaced priorities, and shouldn't be focused on these issues while ignoring more fundamental concerns. I have to say I agree--and I'm no Boyle sycophant. From my perspective, it's hard to make the case that the same city that had to close my local (and very successful) elementary school to save $600,000 can afford to spend, what, several billion on a power company?

But anyway, this was supposed to be about the media's coverage, not Boyle's comments. And look--in the last two posts, we've probably doubled the amount of time/space that those comments will get on the nightly news.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:41:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well it is the media's failure to inform the public that school funding issue has more to do with Salem not providing the funds to keep schools open in PDX then it is with misplaced spending.

Thank God Portland got into the PGE fight, if they didn't we may have ended up getting screwed by another PRIVATE out of state corporation. Even if PDX doesn't buy PGE at least it gives the public some cards to play with.

As for the media not doing its job, why don't they provide the Tax paid by Columbia sports for the last few years. Is it in the $10 dollar range? Have to be pretty ballsy to bitch about bad schools and roads when your doing everything in your power not to pay taxes.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:49:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Tim Boyle is the cover of the oregonian today.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:53:00 PM  
Anonymous capriciously self-selected identity said...

There is way too much posting by "anonymous" here. You can give yourself an identity without signing up -- just select the "Other" button and write something in. You can leave the web page field blank.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 2:22:00 PM  
Anonymous 2524212 said...

I agree 100% about the "real" news that TV news should cover, with the examples named above. Problem is -- and this will ALWAYS be a problem with our medium -- is that there aren't any great VISUALS with these stories. Sure, someone might get a great SOT, but visually... the stories aren't great TV. The newspapers can do a fantastic job (if they want to) of covering politics, government and issues with wide-reaching effect. But the newspapers have the luxury of communicating their story with printed text only. TV must provide compelling pictures of each story... because that's our medium. And, as much as it pains me to say it, TV news managers/producers MUST make content coverage decisions based on the quality & captiveness of the video available for each story.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 3:44:00 PM  
Blogger activist kaza said...

Excuse me, but while we're on the subject of Tim Boyle, isn't this the guy who took his company and ABANDONED the city of Portland last yr. for the greener pastures of Washington County? I missed the b'O piece today, but I'm sure it didn't mention that, did it?

Thursday, May 19, 2005 4:33:00 PM  
Anonymous Gray said...

Gee, it wouldn't be that hard to check, would it?

....snip....

Columbia Sportswear had clashed with Vera Katz, the previous mayor, and a spokesman for Boyle said he was not personally criticizing anyone. But his remarks focused mostly on policies championed by Potter and other city officials.

Potter, who attended the breakfast, left immediately after the alliance meeting concluded without talking to Boyle.

He said later he was taken aback by the tone and substance of Boyle's comments, noting that shortly after his inauguration, he had driven out to talk with him and Columbia chairwoman Gert Boyle about the possibility of their moving their headquarters back to Portland. Columbia moved to unincorporated Washington County in 2001.

....snip...

Thursday, May 19, 2005 4:46:00 PM  
Anonymous Sarah Bott said...

Hi guys and gals in media land--

First off, jeez--you're being awfully hard on yourselves and your industry in here. Cut yourself some slack, would ya?

Ok, so I'm one of those people paid to present the good side of things for the City of Portland. Mea culpa.

But in doing so for the past few years, I've found you to collectively be professional, responsible, responsive, honest, and hardworking.

Local news is pretty much the same in most towns I've been to--large or small.

I'd rather work with folks described as above rather than some of the major network folks who typically resort to all kinds of unethical shenanigans to get stories.

Of course, I'm going to continue to hope you'll cover our little stories about pool openings, etc., and I hope this serves as a forum for the positive change you're looking for. But in the meantime, cut yourselves some slack! The glass isn't totally empty, chipped, and dirty.

And yes, I AM posting this while I'm at work!

--Sarah Bott

Thursday, May 19, 2005 5:34:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm a little bothered by this blogger implying the police shooting isn't important. Any time a police officer shoots a person or gets shot, it is a legitimate story. It is not just run-of-the-mill crime news. Especially in Portland. Police here seem to have itchy trigger fingers. Somebody should explore that in-depth. (And it piques my interest way more than complaints from a businessman who is unknown to the average Portlander.)

Thursday, May 19, 2005 5:50:00 PM  
Anonymous Living in NE PDX said...

The question is posed: "What kind of newscast would you want?"

At best, I'm an occasional watcher of local television news and my reasons are similar to other comments posted here. The greatest of which is what I'd describe as an entropic decline of news into infotainment. Granted the limited timeframe and scope of newscasts aren't conducive to the level of detail other formats can achieve. However, television news' obvious strengths are mostly wasted on techno-flash goo-gahs, pointless or redundant live remotes, dueling choppers, marathon weather wars and stories in excessive proportions of the inane and "blood bath" variety. Why would I want to tune-in for this?

Ignoring for a moment the realities of ratings, marketing, advertising, and non-local ownership, I would desire a newscast that is streamlined, informative, locally oriented and all wrapped in a pretty red bow that doesn't insult the viewer's intelligence. I don't want a three ring circus of the latest Michael Jackson Jesus Juice Folly, Messed-up Marriage Bride and her Much Maligned Groom or Pop Star Wanna-be All American Idolatry! How is this relevant to my life or the average Portlander in general? I think local media should be community focused yet macroscopic enough to include those national and international events that affect us.

Sure, Stumptown isn't rife with exciting and sensational news fodder but you can't tell me that in a city with probably the highest social activism in the country that nothing interesting or new is happening! I want to know what my neighbors are doing to make Portland better. I also want some investigative airing of Portland's "dirty laundry". Maybe you or I could have contributed something or taken action if timely information were available. Some media outlets do better than others (usually the print ones) but it begs the question, where's MY media and why isn't it woven into the fabric of MY community?

Which brings me to the issue of local control and ownership. KBOO, although far from perfect, has a major advantage that it's a platform that's accessible to pretty much anyone and everyone. Additionally, KBOO's morning news segment should be the model for other stations in Portland. It's what I wake to every morning because it is all the things I outlined above plus I find myself making mental notes to dig for more information on the stories that interest me the most. I like it enough I give them money--it would just feel wrong not to reciprocate their hard work. If the dollar is king as it is at other stations, they must be doing something right!

So, if you [the local television and radio media] are to be successful reaching somebody such as myself, you will need to inform me but with enough depth that I'll want find out more. Your reporters should be allowed to do their jobs free from management, ownership and political strictures. Additionally, your business model will likely need an overhaul if not turned completely inside-out. And, as the old saying goes, you can't serve two masters--it's my opinion you should serve the community first and foremost. The Media is OUR voice as citizens of our respective city and state.

A tall order, you might say? The question is answered.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 5:51:00 PM  
Anonymous Argon said...

Sometimes its easier to tell what I don't want to see. Such as (just one example): a total of 30-40 seconds of bumper hype (accumulated during the total broadcast)on a story that lasts less than a minute (and thats not counting teaser time during other shows). What the hell? I see this all the time on local news and it drives me nuts. The amount of bumper filler is ridiculous-- add all that time up and you could actually fill out a story or two with more than just sound bites.

I'm also sick of watching the usual PR suspects from companies and govt's who trot out the same tired lines-- interview somebody else! Then again, that requires research and TV news doesn't seem very interested in spending their money on that.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 6:49:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The problem with media is the complete lack of investigative journalism. Case in point. A 1000 people sat and listen to a man blame every problem in portland on a city government thats been in office for 4 months. He complained about closing schools and bad roads. Now a real journalist would have gone out and found out how much taxes Columbia sports paid over the last 4 years to Portland. This would prove if Columbia is actual paying its fair share and there for have a legit grip or like PGE paid $10 a year. Do news rooms actually have the capacity to investigate leads or connect the dots anymore?

Thursday, May 19, 2005 7:21:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Mr Living in NE Portland... Television News is a commercial, very competitive business. It succeeds by making a profit. That means those newscasts need to attract a lot of viewers. Viewers from all parts of the political spectrum, including liberals from east Portland, and republicans from Hillsboro. While your needs may be fulfilled by listening to KBOO (which in my opinion fills a very vital need in this community) many many more viewers are looking for what is being broadcast on the commercial channels (and cable channels). Sorry sir, more people in this town and this country are interested in American Idol and Survivor, than in the material you find on KBOO in the morning. Not saying that is good, it however is reality in 2005, Again, it is a commerical business.
Finally, take a close look at the TV stations in town and what type of stories they feature. On KATU for example, I doubt if you find the three ring circus you mentioned. You will find it completely differant than Fox 12 at Ten.
That said its also interesting to note the number one morning radio broadcast in this town comes from OPB. It is also commercial, just in a slightly different way.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 8:36:00 PM  
Anonymous Living in NE PDX said...

To anonymous (above).

I'm in agreement that what you describe is the stark reality. I think I framed my comments in a similar vein but the question PDX Media Insider posed was a hypothetical one of what I wanted in a newscast. So I described what I wanted and what I didn't want as it would exist in my little world. That's why I didn't single out any particular station for my criticism but noted things I've seen in general.

I realize what I advocated is 180 degrees from mainstream as it's nothing short of a total paradigm shift. It comes down to my opinion that information and knowledge should not be subject to the forces of commerce. It shouldn't be subject to any one political view, either. When it comes down to it, the only "needs" (as you put it) we all have are to be informed with the unvarnished facts. Until more people understand this and demand it, we'll have more of the same. And the state of our country will remain as it is, or worse.

Thanks for the dialog.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 10:00:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is directed to 2524212...While I understand that T.V. goal is to produce visuals, what you have to understand is that most viewers do not care that every story include captivating pictures. In a way, your explanation almost sounds like a rationalization. Essentially you have implied since nothing exploded, and there was no gun lying in a pool of blood the story has no validity in terms of television journalism. That is a sad excuse for not adequately covering an important story.

Since the numbers show erosion in viewership of local news, why defend a business model that obviously isn't working?

Friday, May 20, 2005 7:02:00 AM  
Anonymous old news guy said...

Local news, except for the weather,is hardly a factor in anyone's lives.
As a former local news producer in a medium sized East Coast market, I know (as everybody in the business knows)that local news is not a journalistic excersize. It is a money-making operation, and nothing more.
We don't have repoters, we have "personalities." We don't editors, we have "producers."
In a town like Portland (where I am on the air) local news consists of the equivalent of the Portland Beavers, triple-A players looking to move up. Some will, some will fall by the wayside, some will stay as career minor leaguers.
It is thus in every news market of this and smaller sizes
Mostly, though, local news just doesn't matter, except to those making money from it.

Friday, May 20, 2005 9:26:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Then why not put something on the air more cost effective Old News Guy? Running a TV news department cannot be a cheap proposition. Why not just fill the slot with some hot syndicated show and leave it at that?

Do all TV newspeople see themselves this way? Do they all believe they are not journalists?

Friday, May 20, 2005 9:46:00 AM  
Anonymous dotyoureyes said...

anonymous said
Since the numbers show erosion in viewership of local news, why defend a business model that obviously isn't working?


Who says it isn't working? TV stations expect a profit margin of anywhere from 30-50%. That's INSANE compared to other industries. Go ask the CEO of Albertson's what he'd do with a margin like that.

Will that margin come down as more people get their news from the internet and cable? Sure. It might come down to levels similar to other industries, and some unsuccessful companies (*cough*fisher*cough) will go under.

The successful ones (in this market, Belo and Meredith) will recognize change is imminent and find ways to make money using the internet and cable as TV revenue slips. But don't think for a minute that TV revenue is a dead business.

Last night, roughly 203,000 households in the Portland DMA watched the news at 5pm -- and only TWO stations had news on at 5!

At 11 last night, nearly 270,000 households watched at least a portion of the news. Add to that another 110,000 homes watching news at 10, and you have a whole lot of eyeballs that advertisers are very willing to pay for.

Friday, May 20, 2005 9:56:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Do all TV newspeople see themselves this way? Do they all believe they are not journalists?"

In response to the above quote, many of us consider ourselves journalists. We're not the ones you have to worry about. Worry about the frighteningly large number of people in newsrooms who either don't aspire to produce good journalism (people who just like being on TV) or those who are so bitter about the way the biz has gone that they don't even try anymore. We're not all the same.

Friday, May 20, 2005 10:02:00 AM  
Anonymous Gray said...

Anonymous, preachily, says this:
...Now a real journalist would have gone out and found out how much taxes Columbia sports paid over the last 4 years to Portland....

A real journalist would know that Columbia hasn't been located in Portland for the last four years, and thus, wouldn't have to pay taxes.

Friday, May 20, 2005 10:40:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Gray,

Didn't realize its been 4 years already, the point still stands, they can go back 8 then or check what they pay now in the no mans land they call home. At some point journalist should do more then regurgitate each sides arguements and find out who has a leg to stand on and who doesn't. Usually the pubic official gets nailed by figures because they are public and easier for a so called journalist to find. You end up having these one sided stories bashing local leadership. Takes more work to find out what the private entity is up too, there for its less likely for the public to see the dirt.

Friday, May 20, 2005 11:35:00 AM  
Blogger PDXNoir said...

I find the news bias interesting. As I read "A place to talk about Portland's media, with the hope that some managers will read it and understand how their product is perceived.", and all I've read about is the news product. Is there not more to a station than news? How do the other, non-news, stations survive?

Frankly, there is too much news, and too little news in this market (as I am sure is true in all markets). News has become entertainment. It's wall-to-wall. I wish they would succumb to the entertainment portion and just put on a "Sabado Gigante" style show for 90 minutes, followed by some "real" news. Draw a new line in the sand separating news and entertainment.

But, a station, and station manager, would have to be a risk taker, a visionary, not a money manager. Maybe KWBP or KPXG or KPDX can take the risk and blaze new territory.

Friday, May 20, 2005 11:58:00 AM  
Anonymous Education Professional said...

I am a counselor at an Oregon public high school outside the Portland/Metro area. The Oregonian's 5/19 lead story in the Metro section(House favors tougher diplomas)is a good example of the misinformation that is reported and promoted in the local media. The sub headline goes on to explain that a bill under consideration in the Oregon House would, "force students to take four years of English and three of math to get a high school degree." The whole focus of the article is patently misleading.

If the reporter, Betsy Hammond, had even bothered to contact anyone at any high school in the state who is remotely familiar with graduation requirements, she probably would have discovered that most, if not all high schools in Oregon already demand students complete 4 years of English in order to graduate. Though the state requirement is only three years, I know not one high school in the entire state that would allow a student to graduate having taken only three years of English.

As for a third year of high school math that would also become a mandatory requirement if this bill passes, this would be a much needed change. However, most students who have ambitions beyond high school understand that two years of math is insufficient preparation for post secondary education, and are self motivated enough to enroll in the advanced math classes they know will prepare them for success in higher education.

Friday, May 20, 2005 12:12:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Interesting that only a couple of people have really answered the question as stated. "As I'm curious, many here say that these newscasts are nothing but crap, and that there is no real reporting going on. How do you define good reporting and a good newscast? What kind of content do you want?"

I'd like to know the answer to the content question myself.

Friday, May 20, 2005 12:28:00 PM  
Anonymous Alan DeWitt said...

Living in NE PDX: "However, television news' obvious strengths are mostly wasted on techno-flash goo-gahs, pointless or redundant live remotes, dueling choppers, marathon weather wars and stories in excessive proportions of the inane and "blood bath" variety. Why would I want to tune-in for this?"

Amen, brother!

As I've said, I don't watch much local TV news anymore. But the above has a lot to do with why I left.

The capacity for live, on-site video seems to me to have operated like a drug on the producers and the public. Showing some reporter standing in a howling wind on a bridge somewhere doesn't add anything useful to a story about a storm. It adds drama, sure, but it's basically content-free. It's the video equivalent of junk food. No one can subsist for long on a diet of calories empty of nutritional content. Likewise, each day some viewers realize that they aren't getting anything worthwhile for their time and turn off local TV news forever. The shrinking audience which remains is progressively selected for viewers interested in junk video. Poll that audience and you'll find that they want more of the same in increasing intensity... so that's what you give them. It's a positive feedback loop that's resulting in a smaller overall audience. (That's not the only problem reducing the TV audience, of course, but it is one that y'all can actually do something about.)

What you people need to do is get your marketing departments to poll and focus group people who have stopped watching local TV news, and figure out what they want. Move that direction.

Not every important headline needs video, live or not. I'd say the fastest way to improve TV news would be to stop gauging the importance of a story by how good of video it makes. Sure, television has a unique advantage over other media here, and it's important to use that where it helps. But no one needs a video of a wrecked car, or police walking around a crime scene, or an accused person walking into court, or a live shot of some hapless reporter freezing his ass off on a bridge. Ban those classes of video (and similar inanities) and produce a show for audience testing... I bet they'll like it fine.

Friday, May 20, 2005 12:33:00 PM  
Blogger PDXNoir said...

For the sweeps, KATU has had a feature called "Government Watchdog", or something with a similar name. That feature just scratches the surface of the type of news content I want to see more. I could watch an hour special on each of the things they have highlighted, but instead, just give me 5 minutes a day of in-depth reporting.

Friday, May 20, 2005 1:20:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'd like to see 5 minutes of Corporation Watchdog. How long did PGE steal before anyone investigated?

Friday, May 20, 2005 1:35:00 PM  
Anonymous MarkDaMan said...

I would like to see more in-depth (I mean a good couple of minutes of information) coverage of real, non-crime, stories. A corporate watchdog, or 2 on your side kinda thing. To many of the stations hit the tip of the iceburg on some great stories but before you know it, they move onto something else.

Not that this was a great story but another peeve...I was watching KGW a couple days ago and they did a report on dirty coffee houses. Since I'm a downtown worker and frequent coffee drinker, I was genuinely interested in which were the dirty shops and which ones were stellar. The news guy ended the segment telling people to go to their website to see the list. Why? Why plug a story and than do a half-assed job reporting it (at least give us to top five and the worst five). If you have a big story and promote it on the radio, website, and even on previous shows, at least make it worth staying tuned in for.

Friday, May 20, 2005 3:45:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

In responding to my response to his/her post, Living in NE Portland said: "Until more people understand this and demand it, we'll have more of the same. And the state of our country will remain as it is, or worse." In spite of my post earlier, I can't agree with you more on this one. Thank YOU for the dialog.. --Mr Anon

Friday, May 20, 2005 4:17:00 PM  
Anonymous Dave said...

The news guy ended the segment telling people to go to their website to see the list. Why? Why plug a story and than do a half-assed job reporting it (at least give us to top five and the worst five).

One reason might be that KGW forces you to sign up when you want to read a story on their website, and then they (I assume) sell names to advertisers. So this tactic is yet another revenue stream.

Friday, May 20, 2005 4:41:00 PM  
Anonymous Eastwood said...

I've got no problem with sending a viewer to the web site for more information. The reporter can post documents and details that she'd never have time for on the air. The web site can be a very useful tool in expanding the amount of depth we can give a story. Logging in is what gives me a pain. I know it's a sales tool, but you can quantify your web viewership by logging the number of hits.

Speaking of Orwellian things, why have we accepted "officer-involved shooting" as the way we describe what happened at 5th and Burnside? Nobody talks that way, except police and media all over the country.

Friday, May 20, 2005 5:00:00 PM  
Blogger activist kaza said...

Gray:

Thanks for the "snip" & maybe if I'm not going to devour all local news everyday, I don't belong here with the PDX media "insiders" but I really don't make a practice of reading the b'O much since it's generally a waste of space/time (and has been for me, since oh the age of 12 or so). IMHO, it doesn't cover Portland well at all, so for that I'd rather read both the WW and Trib and statewide, the RegGuard still wins, hands-down (with the S-J coming up with some relevant political news).

You seem committed to correcting others errors here; hopefully you're an editor someplace! I hope you'll accept some casual interaction here from people who like this blog, but aren't quite as fanatical or fastidious as yourself?

For the record, my point about Boyle was correct, but didn't seem to be getting any play from any of the blog posts/comments I've read. That the b'O mentioned it is besides the point, unless we are simply talking about evaluating the quality of the journalism here, and nothing else...

Saturday, May 21, 2005 7:54:00 AM  
Blogger The One True b!X said...

"From my perspective, it's hard to make the case that the same city that had to close my local (and very successful) elementary school to save $600,000 can afford to spend, what, several billion on a power company?"

Hopefully, if a TV news program covered this issue, they wouldn't make the mistake of thinking that the City of Portland funds the school system or decides which schools to close, the way the above commenter did.

Saturday, May 21, 2005 12:42:00 PM  
Anonymous pdxkona said...

For me, it's not just the content. It's how the content is portrayed. When someone is shot, the way the Portland television news seems to go about reporting it, is in a sensationist manner than annoys me to the point of channel changing. Honestly. I just don't have time for that attitude. If I feel, hear, or see a tiny bit of sensationism in any piece of reporting, I automatically think that the information I am taking in is not truthful. Because if it was trithful, it could stand on its own two feet as it were, without any kind of propping up. This is my BS filter. Also probably why I get much of news from the Christian Science Monitor; I'm not christian nor do I monitor science but I find them to be the most true to the point, less emotionally tinging of the news, than any other media outlet.

Saturday, May 21, 2005 2:03:00 PM  
Anonymous none of your business said...

that's sensationalist, btw.
and besides, one man's sensationalism is another's compelling way of telling a story. are the people here really media pros? much of these comments sound like the whining of people who don't know what's what.

Friday, May 27, 2005 6:54:00 AM  
Anonymous old news guy said...

"most viewers do not care that every story include captivating pictures"

i don't think that poster has any research to back that up, or knows anything about tune-out factors.

Friday, May 27, 2005 7:00:00 AM  
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